A Guide to Seriously Deep Cleaning Your Kitchen

The kitchen is the room that you prepare your favorite dishes, meals are shared, and dish washing occurs, so it’s no wonder that cleaning this space can feel like a pretty daunting task. To make everyday cleaning easier, an occasional deep cleaning is necessary, especially in those tough-to-reach areas. With some Earth-friendly formulas and elbow grease, your entire space will shine again in no time at all!

Kitchen cabinets are one of the very first things people seem to notice upon entering the room, and with such a prominent display comes the need for a thorough scrub. Whether they’re covered in a coat of dust or a film of grease I know exactly what you need to do in order to make them look as good as they did the day they were installed. The next spot to pay extra attention to you ask? Your oven! It’s prone to baked-on stains and charred fragments of previous recipes, it requires a deep clean every few weeks. Don’t skip the inside! Be sure to wash the racks separately with soap and water for a thorough cleanse.

When’s the last time you gave your fridge a good once over? The refrigerator deserves a serious wash at least twice a year, including a full soak of the inside bins. A stainless-steel exterior should be wiped down with a homemade solution and microfiber cloth.

One of the most frequented areas is your entire kitchen is the sink, including the garbage disposal if you have one. As a place to scrub everything from fresh produce to pots and pans, the sink often gets overlooked—it’s where everything goes to get clean, so many assume it needs no care itself. But with food scraps and a build-up of grime, cleaning the sink and disposal is an absolute must. We’re recommending techniques for getting both back in sparkling order.

After you clean your cabinets, appliances, and the sink, there’s one more spot to tackle: the kitchen floor. The technique you use to clean it will depend on what it’s made of, but we’re showing you how to give both hardwood and tile surfaces a good wash. Ready to get cleaning? Our best advice is just ahead.

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Cleaning Cabinets

All you need to give your kitchen cabinets a serious deep clean is Castile soap, a microfiber cloth, and a little elbow grease. If your cabinet doors are greasy, wipe them down with a solution of one-part vinegar to two parts water.

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Freshening Up the Sink and Disposal

You might think a spot where regular washing occurs wouldn’t need such a heavy cleaning, but you might be surprised. Food scraps and grime can leave your kitchen sink looking anything but new. Clean the sink itself with baking soda and lime. For the disposal, try a vinegar-soaked loaf of bread stuffed in the canister. We recommend letting it sit for 15 minutes, then turning on the disposal and flushing it with cold water before following up with frozen citrus rinds.

Cleaning the Oven

The oven is susceptible to baked-on messes and burnt fragments of meals long gone. That’s why it’s important to scrub this appliance every few weeks and to be sure that it gets a deep clean immediately after spills happen. Don’t forget the inside! The oven racks need to be cleaned separately, while the oven itself can be wiped down with a homemade paste.

Cleaning Out the Refrigerator

One of the number 1 biggest projects to tackle during your kitchen deep clean is your refrigerator. As a home to perishable foods, it’s often prone to spills, leaks, and rings left behind from containers. For a serious clean, I recommend removing everything inside and giving the bins a good soak with baking soda and water. For a stainless-steel exterior, mix one-parts vinegar to two-parts water and wipe down with a microfiber cloth!

Cleaning the Floor

Get your kitchen floor looking shiny in no time. I recommend cleaning this easily dirtied surface weekly. The cleaning techniques you use will depend on the material of your floors: for hardwood, sweep or vacuum before mopping; for tile, mop with warm water and all-purpose cleaner.

The Ultimate Spring Cleaning Checklist

There are few rites of spring more satisfying than the annual deep clean. For many people, however, the pleasure comes only after the work is finished. Cleaning your home from top to bottom may never become effortless, but you can make the project more manageable-and even enjoyable. The printable checklist down below offers an overview of everything you need to know-including information on cleansers, stain removal, fabric care, and storage-to zip through the process.

After you read through the tips and techniques, tailor the list to your home and yard. Whether you prefer to proceed from the attic to the basement or start outdoors and wind your way inside, create a realistic schedule and focus on one task at a time, keeping in mind that a single weekend won’t suffice. You’ll need several days for more involved projects, such as shampooing carpets and organizing closets. And be sure to enlist the help of family members.

The tips below outline basic techniques that will help you clean almost every surface (or object) in any room, leaving your home refreshed from top to bottom.

Related: Top 40 Tips On Organizing Your Whole House

Restock Your Cleaning Supplies

Before you can get to work, you need to make sure you’re stocked with your must-have cleaning supplies. On the natural front, baking soda, white vinegar, and Castile soap are essentials you can use to make natural cleansers for nearly any spot in the house. A microfiber mop, like Libman’s Wonder Mop, makes easy work of cleaning vinyl, wood, linoleum, laminate, marble, stone, and ceramic tile—we like that the Wonder Mop’s head is machine-washable, making it an eco-friendly alternative to most conventional alternatives. Plant-based sponges and a reusable spray bottle also make most cleaning jobs easier. You’ll also want to stock up on your favorite mild dishwashing detergent and all-purpose cleanser, or else make a batch of your favorite DIY solution.

Wipe Walls and Ceilings

Use a vacuum to remove dust. Tackle stubborn surface grime, especially prevalent in kitchens, with a solvent-free degreaser (test it first in an inconspicuous area to ensure it won’t mar the surface).

Reseal Grout Lines

The cement-based material between wall, floor, and countertop tiles is extremely porous and stains easily. Protect it with a penetrating grout sealer; it’s best to apply it with a small foam brush.

Vacuum and Shampoo Rugs

Synthetic carpets and rugs with waterproof backings can be deep-cleaned with a rotary shampoo machine and a hot-water extraction machine. Rugs without backings, including Orientals, require professional cleaning.

Dust Books and Shelves

Take everything off the shelves, and brush them (along with the books) with a feather duster. Use the dust brush or crevice tool on a vacuum to reach into tight spots. Wipe the spines of leather-bound books with a clean, soft cloth.

Clean Upholstered Furnishings

Take cushions outside and gently beat them by hand to remove dust. If there are stains, check the pieces for care labels. Use a vacuum’s upholstery and crevice tools to clean under seat cushions.

Polish Metal Door and Window Hardware

Liquid polishes and polish-impregnated cloths work well for medium-tarnished surfaces; pastes and creams are best for heavier work. If the tarnish doesn’t come off, try a stronger product.

Related: 20 Decluttering Tips from Professionals

Dust Your Home Thoroughly

This includes hard-to-reach places, such as the tops of ceiling fans and window casings. Always work from the top of a room down, vacuuming the dust that settles on the floor. Avoid using dusting sprays.

Wax Wooden Furniture

Wipe surfaces with a soft cloth dampened with water and mild dishwashing liquid. Apply paste wax, such as Butcher’s wax, a few feet at a time with a cotton rag folded into a square pad. Let the wax dry; buff with a clean cloth.

Ensure Fire Safety

Change batteries in smoke detectors (this should be done twice a year), and make sure units are free of dust. Teach everyone in your household how to use a fire extinguisher, and review escape plans.

Wash Window Screens

Using warm water and a mild dishwashing liquid, scrub each screen with a brush; rinse thoroughly.

Clean Window Treatments

Many draperies and curtains are machine washable; check labels. Dry clean fabric shades. Wipe wooden blinds with a damp cloth; warm water mixed with a mild dish washing liquid is safe for metal and vinyl blinds.

Wax Non-Wood Floors

Vinyl and linoleum floors that have lost their shine should be waxed with a polish designed for these surfaces. Most stone and tile floors can be treated with either a paste or a liquid wax designed for the material.